Previous Talks

Revd. Dr Joanna Collicutt // What’s Happening in There? The Neuro-Psychology of Spirituality

1 February 2021

Joanna is the Karl Jaspers Lecturer in Psychology and Spirituality at Ripon College, Cuddesdon and Oxford Diocesan Advisor for Spiritual Care for Older People.  She studied experimental psychology and theology at Oxford University, and clinical psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London.  She is a chartered clinical psychologist and specialist neuropsychologist, registered as a practitioner with the Health Professions Council.

Her interests are wide ranging, reflected in publications on cognitive behaviour therapy, brain and behaviour, natural theology, psychological approaches to the Bible, psychological trauma, the spirituality of children and people with special needs, and medical ethics. She is the author of many academic papers and several books including The Dawkins Delusion? (SPCK 2007 with Alister McGrath); Ethical practice in brain injury rehabilitation (OUP 2007); Jesus and the gospel women (2009 SPCK); and The psychology of Christian character formation (2015 SCM).

Professor John Lennox // Meaning, Mathematics, Matter, and the Mind Behind it All

18 January 2021

John Lennox needs no introduction. Born and raised in Northern Ireland, he went on to gain his Masters and PhD in Mathematics from Cambridge University. He also holds an MA and DPhil from Oxford University (by incorporation) and an MA in Bioethics from the University of Surrey. Currently he is a Professor (emeritus) of Mathematics at Oxford University, an internationally renowned speaker and he has written several books on the interface of philosophy, science and religion. His most recent titles are Have no Fear (2018), on evangelism today, Can Science Explain Everything? (2019), on the relationship between science and Christianity, an the six-part Quest for Reality and Significance series co-written by David Gooding (2018-9). Furthermore, in addition to over seventy published mathematical papers, he is the co-author of two research level texts in algebra in the Oxford Mathematical Monographs series.

Usha Reifsnider // Conversion from an Anthropological Perspective: To be British, Gujarati and Christian

Usha is a PhD Candidate based at the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies. Before starting an MA in Practical Theology at the University of Chester, she had been involved in full time mission practice and training for over 25 years. She is an experienced missionary, who has worked across the world, including with migrant peoples throughout Europe, the Middle East and North America.

Early in life Usha converted from Hinduism to Christianity, which has very much grounded her missionary and academic life ever since. Specialising in Anthropology, her focus now is on British Hindus who have converted to Christianity, their sense of identity, and their experiences of culture and religion. She has recently published a ground-breaking study: ‘Transcultural Insights into Christian Conversion of British Gujarati Hindus’ in the journal, ‘Studies in World Christianity: The Edinburgh Review of Theology and Religion’. She is also a part of the Centre for Missionaries from Majority World, a group of scholars from across the world who are interested in engaging with migrants of other faiths.


Dr. Kosta Milkov // Faith, Culture and Mission in the Balkan States

16 November 2020

Dr. Kosta Milkov is the Director of RZIM Macedonia, and is the Founder and Director of the Balkan Institute for Faith and Culture. He earned an MA in Theology from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. From 2005 – 2010 he lived in England, where he earned an MSt and a DPhil in the fields of Early Christian Studies and Patristics at the University of Oxford, for which he received the Langham International Partnership Scholarship.

Kosta has been involved in research work, which includes his participation in the Postdoctoral Research Seminar organised by Langham International Partnership, the Balkan Strategy Report for the Global Scripture Impact of the American Bible Society, as well as writing numerous newspaper and magazine articles for the Macedonian press.



Dr. Graeme McLean // Applied Ethics, Epistemology, and the Philosophy of Religion

9 November 2020

Dr. Graeme McLean graduated from Monash University in Australia before receiving a Commonwealth Scholarship to do his Bphil and Dphil in Philosophy at Oxford. From 1990 to 2004 he was a member of the Department of Philosophy of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has since been a proud resident of Wagga Wagga, in New South Wales, Australia, wherein he served as the head of the philosophy department of Charles Sturt University for many years. Most of his philosophical work is in applied ethics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of religion.

Racheal Mutesi // In Word and Deed: Evangelism and Socio-Economic Empowerment in Kampala, Uganda

26 October 2020

Prior to coming to Oxford to study theology at Wycliffe Hall and to participate in OCCA, the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics, in 2014-2015, Racheal completed her Bachelor of Commerce at Makerere University.

Racheal says the most exciting part about her ministry is seeing God at work, and watching how God uses a simple conversation to bring healing. Racheal has participated in numerous missions, including an RZIM mission week in Uganda where the team spoke at nine different universities. She loves to speak on anything that avails the opportunity to preach the gospel. We very much look forward to talking with her about her life, calling, and socio-economic empowerment and evangelism in Kampala, Uganda.

Dr. Alister McGrath // The Intellectual History of Questions in Science and Religion

19 October 2020

Professor Alister McGrath is the Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion, the Director of the Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion, and a Fellow of Harris Manchester College. He is known for his work in historical and systematic theology, as well as the relationship between science and religion. He has also been known as a critic of New Atheism and as an advocate of Theological Critical Realism. His many books include ‘The Twilight of Atheism’, ‘The Dawkins Delusion?’, and ‘A Scientific Theology’.

Dr. Carolyn Weber // To be a Romantic: Longing in Literature and Liturgy

12 October 2020

Dr. Carolyn Weber is an award-winning author, popular professor and international speaker. She has given numerous radio, television and podcast interviews on the intersection of faith and literature, as well as topics related to women and faith. She has served as faculty at Oxford University, Seattle University, University of San Francisco and Westmont College, and was the first female dean of St. Peter’s College, Oxford. Her books include ‘Surprised by Oxford’ and ‘Sex and the City of God.’

Prof. Dapo Akande: Public International Law

8 June 2020
Dapo Akande is Professor of Public International Law at the Blavatnik School of Government, a Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford and Co-Director of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC). Before moving to the Blavatnik School, he was Professor of Public International Law at Oxford Law Faculty and was, from 2012 to 2017, Co-Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations. He has held visiting professorships at Yale Law School, the University of Miami School of Law and the Catolica Global Law School, Lisbon.
Dapo’s academic interests include armed conflict and humanitarian law, international humanitarian law and international human rights law and humanitarian relief operations in armed conflict.

Dr. Sabina Alkire: On Earth as it is in Heaven: Economic Approaches to Multidimensional Poverty

25 May 2020

Dr Sabina Alkire works on a new approach to measuring poverty and well-being that goes beyond the traditional focus on income and growth. This multidimensional approach to measurement includes social goals, such as health, education, nutrition, standard of living and other valuable aspects of life.

Her expertise includes the measurement of poverty, quality of life, happiness and economics, Millenium Development Goals, inequality, and South India and Latin America.